November 20, 2013

Winter Light

By Stowel Lake Farm

Our lantern walk is a simple and much anticipated event on the farm. The intention is to bring attention to our inner light as it gets darker and darker outside. We then walk together though the darkness singing songs. It is truly lovely.
Lanterns can be anything you want them to be- a bought lantern, a tin can with holes drilled in, a paper lantern, anything goes and they all look beautiful lit up in the dark. This year we experimented with making balloon lanterns. They ended up being quite easy to make.

A crafty lantern table with leaves, ripped tissue paper, glue.
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Lanterns drying overnight. We popped the balloons when they were dry.
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walking with my lantern..my lantern’s walking with me
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November 18, 2013

Haidee’s favourite BEET salad

By Stowel Lake Farm

A Great way to use our HUGE beets!

2 Large beets

2 Tbsp Balsamic Vinegar

1 tsp Maple syrup or Honey

1 Tbsp olive oil

A sprinkle of good sea salt

Wash beets, trim root and stem ends. Cut beet in half, cover with cold water and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to medium, cover partially and cook until tender when pierced with a fork (about 15 minutes). Drain in colander, when cool enough to handle slip skins off. Cut into wedges, cubes or slices, toss in a bowl with balsamic, maple, olive oil and sea salt.

I like to chill the beets for a little while but they are also great served at room temperature. These beets are absolutely delicious on their own, but at this time of year I like to serve them on a bed of our finely chopped kale or autumn salad greens. Topped with a shaving of Montana , Feta or a little creamy Gorgonzola cheese and a handful of local hazelnuts turns this salad into a perfect autumn meal.  Serves 4

November 17, 2013

Cultivating Compassion

By Stowel Lake Farm

Robert Crusick was here for the weekend of sitting with the intention to cultivate compassion. A compassionate attitude extends beyond helping one feel more empathy and concern for others, it can reduce the distress we feel in difficult situations and can become a profound personal resource in times of stress. It includes developing the strength to be present with suffering, the courage to take compassionate action and the resilience to prevent compassion fatigue. These are qualities that support a wide range of goals — from improving personal and work relationships to making a positive difference in the world. Through instruction, mindfulness & loving-kindness meditation, and group interaction, the group got to explore and strengthen the qualities of compassion, empathy, and kindness for others and for ourselves.
November 15 – 17, 2013

November 11, 2013

Warriors for the Human Spirit

By Stowel Lake Farm

Warriors for the human spirit willingly work in troubling and difficult situations, striving to use skills of insight and compassion rather than aggression and fear. This is difficult work, but rich in meaning and purpose. This retreat was a time to explore some of the essential skills of warriorship, all of which focus on developing trust and confidence in our capacities: identifying our right work; identifying what triggers aggression and fear; maintaining presence in the midst of chaos; developing inner peace.
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FacilitatorMargaret Wheatley, EdD, received her doctorate in Organizational Behaviour and Change from Harvard University, and a Masters in Media Ecology from New York University. A global citizen since her youth, she writes, teaches, and speaks about how we might organize and accomplish our work in chaotic times. She was a practicing consultant for 30 years, is co-founder and President emerita of The Berkana Institute, and has written four books and numerous articles. www.margaretwheatley.com

November 9 – 11, 2013

November 08, 2013

November Abundance

By Stowel Lake Farm

It’s dark these days. The clocks have gone back and the clouds have been thick and heavy. The gardens are quiet. We had some frost the other week that pretty much put an end to our salad mix for the season. And rain. Lots of rain. In between we’ve been gathering pears off the ground so that they can ripen, bringing in the last of the tomatoes, taking out the plants finally, picking peppers and apples. It feels like a beautiful little burst of abundance at the end of it all.
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Tomatoes in all their subtle colours.
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Some of the last picking of the year.
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Sorting peppers for sale.

November 05, 2013

Pumpkin Carving

By Stowel Lake Farm

It has become a tradition. Three years ago Jennifer and David had some people over to carve pumpkins together and now we have a official “pumpkin carving party”. This year it was a couple of days before Halloween. You can’t do it on Halloween – too much getting dressed up and ready to go out, but you can’t also do it too far in advance or you run the risk of rotten pumpkins. Our tradition now includes:
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carving….
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dressing up…
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soup in a pumpkin (this year it was Hearty Winter Vegetable – soooo good!)….
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fire…. and fireworks (no photo!) and fun.